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IPS International Learning Community 2018-12-12T17:22:15+00:00

The International IPS Learning Community

The IPS Learning Community has evolved over the last seventeen years, starting with three sites in 2001. Currently, the community includes 21 U.S. states, the District of Columbia, Alameda County (California), Broward County (Florida), and five countries/regions outside the U.S.: Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, New Zealand, and Montreal, Canada.

Within these states, regions, and countries, IPS trainers, mental health leaders, vocational rehabilitation leaders, peer leaders, family leaders, and employers work together in serving people with serious mental illness who want to gain employment as part of their recovery.

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Members of the community learn from each other. All 24 states and regions and 5 countries share ideas for how to fund IPS programs, how to use fidelity and employment outcomes to guide technical assistance, and how to expand IPS services across their regions.

Facts & Figures

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US States
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Countries (Italy, Spain, The Netherlands, New Zealand, & Montreal, Canada)
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served during the 2nd quarter of 2018
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Agencies providing IPS services

The IPS Employment Center helps state implementation teams learn how to provide effective IPS training and conduct fidelity reviews so that program staff achieves good employment outcomes. They use a train-the-trainers model to help states, regions, and countries build their own expertise and infrastructure. In addition, online training programs (registration is discounted for programs in the learning community), conferences calls, fidelity report-writing tools, and other types of assistance are available for members of the IPS learning community.

Benefits of Joining

Being a member of the International IPS Learning Community provides states, regions, and countries with many opportunities that foster growth, guide successful implementation, and support sustainment of their IPS programs. These opportunities include:

  • Opportunities to learn from the experiences of others

  • Learn about new strategies to implement and sustain IPS Supported Employment services

  • Invitation to participate in stakeholder teleconferences (e.g., state team calls, fidelity reviewer calls, IPS trainer calls, Vocational Rehabilitation liaison calls, family calls, peer calls)

  • Invitation to the annual meeting of the IPS Learning Community

  • Opportunities to participate in research studies of the IPS Learning Community

  • Reduced rate for online courses

  • Free use of the fidelity report software

  • IPS supervisor bi-monthly tips email

Click here to learn how to apply

Interested in Joining?

Connect, learn, and collaborate with other states and countries that provide IPS services
Click here to learn how to apply

Community Members

Connecticut

2002

South Carolina

2002

Vermont

2002

Kansas

2002

Maryland

2002

Oregon

2002

District of Columbia

2002

Illinois

2005

Ohio

2005

Minnesota

2006

Missouri

2008

Kentucky

2009

Wisconsin

2010

Alameda County, California

2012

Italy

2012

Netherlands

2012

Colorado

2013

North Carolina

2013

Spain

2013

Tennessee

2014

Alabama

2015

Washington

2015

Utah

2016

Broward County, Florida

2017

Michigan

2017

Oklahoma

2017

New Zealand

2017

Montreal West Island CIUSSS

2018

Alaska

2018

Latest Statistics on Clients Served and Working

Participant Stories

“NAMI Kansas is committed to the value of employment for individuals with mental illness.  The Learning Community has certainly added value to our advocacy agenda and has definitely enhanced our knowledge of how the program works and how it can be adapted for different populations.”

Rick Cagan, Executive Director, National Alliance on Mental Illness- NAMI Kansas

“When I was a new trainer it was helpful to know people from the IPS Learning Community who had been doing this work for a while so that I did not have to reinvent the wheel. For example, learning about ways to build consensus for IPS and ideas for connecting with leadership over time. The other members also helped me understand what was most important in my role as a trainer. Through the learning community, I have a network of colleagues who are very accessible and willing to help however they can.”

Jackie Pogue, IPS Trainer, Alameda County, California

“It has been inspirational to be part of the IPS learning community. It’s helpful to hear about new developments and new insights in IPS. We have benefitted by learning about IPS implementation from others in the learning community. We take what others have learned and fit it into the Dutch or European context, and we also share our own successes with the group. For example, we have been interested in supported education and anti-stigma campaigns for a long time. The learning community focuses on employment outcomes and the structure of submitting and reviewing outcomes has helped us to improve our programs. The annual meeting is great–we look forward to hearing the speakers. And we like the people at lot–that is part of the fun!”

Jaap van Weeghel, Directeur Wetenschap , Kenniscentrum Phrenos, Netherlands

“People in the learning community have helped us think about how to serve youth through IPS, how to incorporate peers into IPS services, how to help people who have legal backgrounds, and other issues. From the perspective of someone in Vocational Rehabilitation, I was initially concerned about how to help VR counselors follow our policies while also adhering to IPS practice principles such as zero exclusion and rapid job search. The learning community helped with that. In fact, now we are applying aspects of rapid job search as we help other groups of people, not just those who are in IPS programs!”

Kathleen Enders, Wisconsin Vocational Rehabilitation

“Without the IPS Employment Center’s Learning Community, IPS within the Alabama mental health system would not exist today. Involvement with the IPS Employment Center has fostered one of the most profound outcomes for our state, a stronger more robust relationship between the mental health and vocational rehabilitation service systems. Through the mutual interest in serving individuals with serious mental illnesses, both state agencies are committed to pursuing IPS in Alabama. Joining the IPS Employment Center Learning Community has provided the platform and guidance from which our collaboration has grown.”

Jessica Hales, Alabama Mental Health